Kafka’s Genius Philosophy

Пікірлер: 673

  • Fiction Beast
    Fiction Beast Жыл бұрын

    Kafka vs Proust kzread.info/dash/bejne/eKd7maaEca3Ao5M.html Franz Kafka dedicated his life to literature. Unfortunately he didn't get to enjoy it as his fame and success came after his death. So this video is to celebrate his life and his work, but also the lessons he offers us, a century later. I hope you enjoy the video and take a few things away from it.

  • Ozymandias Ultor

    Ozymandias Ultor

    28 күн бұрын

    @Jörn Spirit No problem... I am not an expert, but I have read all his novels and his most famous stories, and I said, it was a long time ago, and what I remember, what stayed with me is some feeling of pessimism and those twisted worlds in which his protagonists live... But, there is something that can be learned, like from that specific story about justice, the door in front which stays that scary big sentinel and the man who came to seek justice... the door was opened, and he was staying there until he got old and was dying and then that sentinel told him that the door was just for him, but now it is too late... That strikes me as a very pessimistic view of some things in our life.

  • Jörn Spirit

    Jörn Spirit

    28 күн бұрын

    @Ozymandias Ultor thanks for your explanations and views! I think what I aimed at with the 'fundamental truth' is that most of us find ourselves confronted with systems, that are not in our favour or even interested in us as a person... this is not an absolute truth, but its a very common experience for many people, especially with a low rank in society. I do not feel especially competent to talk about his novels, as its a long time ago that I read some of them... I myself have moved into a spiritual understanding of life... without that I would probably experience the world as too cold and lonely and hopeless... I don't believe that I can change the world, but I can change myself, and decide, who I want to be, and then strive for it. I notice that I trail off here from the theme of Kafka, so I stop now... but thanks for your response!

  • Ozymandias Ultor

    Ozymandias Ultor

    28 күн бұрын

    @Jörn Spirit I see Kafka as a good writer, you wrote something about fundamental truth in his writings, but he wrote a few novels and many stories, and I wasn't able to see some uniform fundamental message, except maybe constant critique wrapped in stories that were quite pessimistic. Now, it depends on people, on the audience how they will read and understand his novels. Today most people see his novels as a critique of birocracy, etc, but he is a strange writer, the relation between his protagonists with women is strange, and his messages are sometimes strange in a good way, but very pessimistic, like that story that K is listening in that church in Process, about the man who was standing in front of the gate of the law, and died waiting for, no matter that the door was only for him to enter. Maybe I should read his novels and stories again, I have read all of those, I mean novels and the best stories some 3 decades ago, and I remember just the feeling of uneasiness and that there was strange pessimism in those novels... Maybe now, when I am older, I might see his writings from a new perspective.

  • Jörn Spirit

    Jörn Spirit

    28 күн бұрын

    @Ozymandias Ultor ...I mean 'failure' the same way its used in this blog... failure is a definition, not a truth... and I think what I said makes it clear that I do not see it as a failure... :) and I don't recall to have talked about 'fundamental truth'... did I?!? Why don't you just state how you see/understand it, instead of asking these questions? We all might and most likely do have different perceptions, which is natural because of the way we are...

  • Ozymandias Ultor

    Ozymandias Ultor

    28 күн бұрын

    @Jörn Spirit What failure? And what is that fundamental truth?

  • Endymion766
    Endymion7662 ай бұрын

    Kafka doesn't give sad endings necessarily, just "normal" endings, aka, disappointing ones, because that's how it usually goes in real life. Almost everything is a disappointment eventually. I think that's why so many people can relate to those stories so much.

  • Sher E Alam Women Upliftment Trust

    Sher E Alam Women Upliftment Trust

    2 күн бұрын

    Life is inherently disappointing!! Disappointed 😞☹️

  • 十六夜殆桜

    十六夜殆桜

    26 күн бұрын

    Your point is very good and enlightening. Thank you

  • Age of Reason

    Age of Reason

    Ай бұрын

    @Art Kirakosyan Incompatibility?

  • Age of Reason

    Age of Reason

    Ай бұрын

    Life ends in death.

  • Frannie S
    Frannie S3 ай бұрын

    ‘The Metamorphosis’ was the first and only book that has ever made me cry, and at the time I didn’t fully understand why. But as I’ve gotten older I think I understand that it’s because the story and all of Kafka’s works are so hopeless and filled with struggle, which are so much more relatable to modern life than typical books, that have happy endings and a purpose. Kafkas books are sad, yet so much more real. Anyways, that’s why he’s my favorite author. :)

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    7 күн бұрын

    @D H Kafka was a genius.

  • D H

    D H

    7 күн бұрын

    This is one of my favorite books of all time because it taught me 3 lessons that i never forgot: 1. All love is conditional. 2. If you are a man, you are only valuable if you provide something. The second you dont, you are considered a burdon, even by those closest to you. 3. Civilization is ultimately a facade. Not bad for a short stoy lol, man was a genius.

  • blerp blerpson

    blerp blerpson

    18 күн бұрын

    you don't read enough

  • realNincompoopline

    realNincompoopline

    19 күн бұрын

    Seems like you could like "Annihilate" by Houellebecq. Also maybe try "The Fall" by Camus.

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    During his time, his was modern life.

  • monochrome
    monochrome3 ай бұрын

    I think he found freedom by writing, his father was controlling, he was unsatisfied with his job, and unhappy with his relationships it's almost like he was a prisoner of life and was aware of it

  • Senthil Kumar

    Senthil Kumar

    26 күн бұрын

    Relationships are indeed a prison as u need to confine ur personality to make the relationship work

  • Hirak Chatterjee

    Hirak Chatterjee

    26 күн бұрын

    @nnamdi kingsley I believe the original comment on which I replied to was retracted. My reply was to a comment stating that a person can always turn their life around and become successful , to which what I said is still true. Some people simply are born too unfortunate and have no means to access to a fair and competitive system , This is beyond the scope of the said mental state you are referring to. Your statement is also correct but atleast some people who are miserable in their life are somewhat afforded a choice to turn their life around , some people simply lack any such choice and I was pointing to that distinction.

  • nnamdi kingsley

    nnamdi kingsley

    26 күн бұрын

    @Hirak Chatterjee People's views on life could keep them in bondage irrespective of their external life situation. Which means that the third world person that you refer to may have the perceptive freedom to turn his/her around while a person in a first world couldn't because of his/her state of mind.

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    @loneranger cristo OK. I will read your post again.

  • loneranger cristo

    loneranger cristo

    Ай бұрын

    @Anton Boludo That was not the case here! You didn't answer to my reply as it is directed to your question! Let me know your interpretation or the opinion rather telling about yourself.

  • Crooked Paths
    Crooked Paths3 ай бұрын

    Kafka is one of the few writers that doesn’t give a happy ending. It is quite liberating.

  • Joe B

    Joe B

    2 күн бұрын

    @Trevor Bewley I have great respect for French cinema. They invented the artform, and the French people still take it seriously. Just as they generally take art seriously. I hope to move there soon. However, here in America things are very different. Good luck finding a theater in this country showing anything but 'blockbuster' trash. Hollywood is structurally incapable of producing great art.

  • Trevor Bewley

    Trevor Bewley

    2 күн бұрын

    ​@Joe B And yet, cinemas in places like France and South Korea are still standing. The "happy ending is the only ending" is an American school of thought. Gotta expand your horizons a bit.

  • Paige Rasmussen

    Paige Rasmussen

    18 күн бұрын

    @carlita pacita Macbeth (a puff piece), Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing; Anna Karenina...They may be complex, and not always happy for the protagonist, but happy ending stories are all over Europe. There was a whole period of time starting in the late 1700s, concurrent with the Age of Reason, when telling more realistic stories focused on messy human tendencies and regular life events rather than fate and less or no fantasy elements was the rising style. I don't think "Romantic" is the most descriptive term for the period as I think it focuses on the shifting concept of relationship with nature, which is not obvious. You could think of these books as Reasonable to Realistic, even if many are still highly moralistic: the good guys aren't necessarily heroes and bad things happen to them according to interpersonal and societal whims and consequences, things work out according to the ways of the world rather than divine law, and there can be happiness through all kinds of changes even if it's just that the character's perspective on life proves to be accurate and led them the best way through bullshit, or got updated accordingly.

  • carlita pacita

    carlita pacita

    19 күн бұрын

    Maybe us writers will give you happy endings but not European ones: Balzac, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Céline, Zola, Wilde, Shakespeare, buzzatti…. Not one novel of theirs finish with happy endings

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    He no doubt lived in a nightmare world, despite being in the beautiful city of Prague. Rejected by Germans, Czechs and his fellow Jews.

  • Christopher Gong
    Christopher Gong9 ай бұрын

    Kafka is one of writers I love the most. He is 100 years ahead of his contemporaries on realizing these and put them in writings.

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    @Fiction Beast Very probable. He was rejected by everyone, Czechs, Germans and Jews.

  • Dean Ronson

    Dean Ronson

    Ай бұрын

    @Fiction Beast Only the least talented people or idiots think of themselves as geniuses. Can you say, "I am a stable genius."

  • Julia kos

    Julia kos

    2 ай бұрын

    I love him.

  • Christopher Gong

    Christopher Gong

    2 ай бұрын

    @j0nnyism not sure if there are anything eternal truths out there. But I like his observation, clarity on deep inner struggles and ability to portrait the absurdity of life that we live, which I guess could be called as eternal truth? :)

  • j0nnyism

    j0nnyism

    2 ай бұрын

    No he’s writing is about eternal truths. These things have always existed and exists in the writing of many of his contemporaries

  • Nicholas Leonard
    Nicholas Leonard8 ай бұрын

    I feel for him. So much. I churn out novella after novella. Poetry collection after poetry collection. I stray so far from what everyone else does. I love making art, but the lack of love for my art is crushing. I'm never going to stop though, because of people like Franz.

  • Nicholas Leonard

    Nicholas Leonard

    23 күн бұрын

    @Scott Maclellan The train begins its iambic chugging like a heartbeat across the railroad track underneath the night’s purple-veined biceps. And, now I know, I’m never going back. Pass the line of trees, retired farmlands, I watch the window flicker like a screen. That alluring film is dull and plotless. True stories makes me want to fall asleep. The train ignores the land it races past, but the lakes and ponds are waving calmly. The night is breathing on the blades of grass, but I hear nothing about such a scene. The blues of night are dancing on the Earth like a silent film accepting color. (from my collection called "Love, Lost Below The Lunar Lampposts")

  • Nicholas Leonard

    Nicholas Leonard

    23 күн бұрын

    @Scott Maclellan And yet I stood before the kraken’s mouth, and all its white collared- I mean ivory colored teeth. It felt defining as its breath toasted my face. And, squinting into its mouth, I saw a forty year fall. Its throat; a tunnel-slide of wasted time; four decades to reach its safety net stomach- retirement, where digesting men were looking up at their forty year fall. And there, floating on the water’s surface, waiting, the kraken kept its mouth agape for me, sucking in my scent, inhaling. Hungry. I stared and watched the beast be patient before I walked away. by Nicholas Leonard

  • Nicholas Leonard

    Nicholas Leonard

    23 күн бұрын

    @Scott Maclellan Who’ll buy the poet in the shopping cart? Big business divvies out the shopping list. They know nobody can purchase his heart. Influencers, record and twirl your arms. Another gifted child gone adrift. Who’ll buy the poet in the shopping cart? Exhausted, curling up and torn apart, a blooming tear mimics the nickel’s glint. He knows nobody can purchase his heart. Who sees him rolling down where cars are parked? as highways stretch their hungry jaws for him. They’ll steal the poet in the shopping cart. A parking lot beneath a sunset’s harp. He thinks the Heavens want to make him grin. They own the poet in the shopping cart. He’s looking up as people’s time extincts. as busy people never hear his hint: “I’m just a poet in my shopping cart. Thank God nobody can purchase my heart.” by Nicholas Leonard

  • Scott Maclellan

    Scott Maclellan

    25 күн бұрын

    Post some here!

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    @Nicholas Leonard Good! Never give up! Failure is lessons.

  • Nick Voutsas
    Nick Voutsas3 ай бұрын

    I believe that Kafka has the unique ability of writing down bid nightmares. Nightmares help us resolve problems thereby allowing us to face the next day more optimistically. What Kafka taught me is that many problems are not resolved even though they seemed resolved in our awake life. It's when we live our nightmares that's when we see reality. Kafka has a great deal of faith and does believe because he sees through the veneer of daily life and injustices of man. He has not lost hope but rather he sees truth hoping in love which the world denied him. Normal people have nightmares resolve some and live to see another successful day ,Kafka lived his nightmares and when he died he resolved his living nightmares and is at peace with his creator. Sometimes to die is to live and in his life he experienced many dead end deaths but in death he discovered eternal life.

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    Well said.

  • Ritesh Rauniyar
    Ritesh RauniyarАй бұрын

    The first sentence "I'm free and that's why I am lost", I totally get it and am going through the same phase. 😅

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Ай бұрын

    Great! Use the freedom to create something beautiful.

  • Alternate Rock
    Alternate RockАй бұрын

    "Through failure we survive", the failure in gene multiplication results in mutation which may result in death but also help us survive. That's a beautiful observation 🤯

  • Abel Marin
    Abel Marin5 ай бұрын

    I just finished the metamorphosis. I just want to say thank you for recommending this. I had heard about the story for years but never seemed interesting. The Metamorphosis is truly one of the best stories of the 20th century.

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    Yes it is.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    5 ай бұрын

    Awesome. Thank you!

  • AudrEYheart21
    AudrEYheart212 ай бұрын

    "life sometimes has no meaning/sense, is a nightmare even"..."sometimes we're all alone"... "sometimes life itself is a trial, our value to society and to our family is only as long as we're a provider, useful, and productive member. Once we're no longer able to do that, we have no worth".... "Artists need an audience to motivate them, to sustain them. This is an innate human desire to be admired by others." "The poor man shouts but they cannot hear his voice. He is so poor that he has become invisible, weightless, and inaudible." -Franz Kafka

  • Anton Boludo

    Anton Boludo

    Ай бұрын

    Oh my goodness this is so true. You can see it in his brilliant body of work. At least it can inspire other to improve their lives.

  • Just some bloke
    Just some bloke2 ай бұрын

    I found so much to resonate with Camus. Kafka's understanding of absurdity seems to be his method of surviving the knowledge that weighs on him. I know it works for me.

  • Sachie Asamizu
    Sachie Asamizu10 күн бұрын

    I once saw Daniel Day Lewis as Kafka in a screenplay. He wasn’t depicted as a complainer but had strong sympathies and sensitivities to his clients in the insurance company. (edit) Of course you said he was not a complainer at the beginning.

  • jhs smith
    jhs smith2 ай бұрын

    this is great! i had very thoughts like this beginning about a month ago. for example, what's wrong with failure? why fear failure? it's not scary. we all fail. there are seeds of beauty in failure, strife and suffering. glad to know i'm on the right path. thank you.

  • PLA - Pixels, Literatura e Arte
    PLA - Pixels, Literatura e Arte14 күн бұрын

    THAT was an amazing class! God bless you, Fiction Beast! :)

  • Sharon Theodore
    Sharon Theodore Жыл бұрын

    You have put a tremendous amount of time and effort into this and thank you so much for that. Throughout, I kept thinking of Proust and his more optimistic tone despite being bedridden. It looks like having a brutal family life is just one reason for creating such 'off-beat' literature. God bless you.

  • Jonathan Ellis

    Jonathan Ellis

    16 күн бұрын

    @Fiction Beast I agree with you; the best things I create are when all else is lost in my life.

  • Lime Juice

    Lime Juice

    3 ай бұрын

    @Sharon Theodore fffxg

  • Pete Mavus

    Pete Mavus

    8 ай бұрын

    @Elizabeth Wolfe " This Awful Rowing Toward God "

  • Elizabeth Wolfe

    Elizabeth Wolfe

    Жыл бұрын

    @Fiction Beast Yess i noticed that in My own poetry. We're Looking for some Sense and justice In the disasters of Our needless Suffering.

  • Sharon Theodore

    Sharon Theodore

    Жыл бұрын

    @Fiction Beast Thank you so much for highlighting the differences. Very fascinating and worth a study taking into account not just the personal lives but also the political environment. This would would be a topic worth of a doctoral degree. I also wanted to add that one acquires depth when one goes deep into the hole, only then can one experience a myriad of emotions that are not experienced by many of us. I learn so much from you and by the way I have just ordered 'The Bridge over the Drina'. Stay well and so many thanks.

  • mrcaryatis
    mrcaryatis2 ай бұрын

    Kafka definitely was a fascinating thinker if you into his way of thinking. His death according to Reiner Stach was caused by the laryngeal TB wich is a very rear complication. But on the other hand because of his frequent interactions with the prostitutes he may have another rear disease - siphylis of the esophagus - which has even more exuberant dysphagia. It can be easily undiagnosed particularly if the focus is on TB.

  • Three Thrushes
    Three Thrushes2 ай бұрын

    Playing the same musical refrain on repeat for 33 minutes was a deliciously Kafkaesque move.

  • Antoine Subit Les Coups
    Antoine Subit Les Coups5 ай бұрын

    There are many fiction and literature and philosophy channels. It won't be an exaggeration to say this is the best of all of them. Why? Coz of your attention to detail and the profound inferences that you derive from facts and quotations from the writer. I chuckled from delight from time to time watching the video as the voiceover narration was almost impeccable. You've got another subscriber :)

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    5 ай бұрын

    Awesome! Thanks so much!

  • Sudarshan Badoni
    Sudarshan Badoni12 күн бұрын

    Isn't that great to note how these authors transform SUFFERINGS into " meaningfulness " and so still AREN'T these videos AREN'T presenting something that's not at all available nowadays and obiviously thanks a lot to the presenter maker and UTUBE. Thanks again.

  • Vidyeshwar Prasad
    Vidyeshwar Prasad2 ай бұрын

    TREMENDOUS!!! Such a qualitative, brilliantly scripted, comprehensive n engagingly narrated upload on the one n only one :Kafka! I remained hooked from start to end as if I was watching a riveting movie.Thanks a lot Fiction Beast!

  • Barry Moore
    Barry Moore3 ай бұрын

    Insightful analysis here, imparting some novel perspectives on the value to the study of Kafka's legacy. I did want to offer a couple of corrections and observations: Kafka was born in 1883, not 1882, and as Dostoevsky died in 1881, Kafka was born two years later. However one may parse the nationality of the man Kafka, his works belong to German literature, having been written in the German language. The site of Kafka's death was a sanatorium for TB sufferers in Kierling, Austria, rather than a hotel per se. I would also challenge the argument made here that 'Amerika' is the sole story by Kafka to resolve in happiness of sorts. 'The Metamorphosis', though ending dismally for Gregor, concludes on a note of optimism for Gregor's surviving family, however ironic the author's tone may be in this instance. Overall, quite a rewarding presentation, encouraging me to explore your channel further.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Thanks for the corrections. Appreciate you taking the time.

  • 37Dionysos
    37Dionysos2 ай бұрын

    Nice work---The "ten lessons" are eloquent and empowering!

  • Wizard of B
    Wizard of B2 ай бұрын

    I remember reading "The Castle" as a teenager. I was so intrigued by the mysterious nature of the narration that, I began sketching The Castle on a piece of paper ! A rare underrated talent was he. Thanks a lot for this upload.I subscribed your channel..

  • Rhonda Bower

    Rhonda Bower

    Ай бұрын

    @Franz Schmidt Oh wow I didn’t know that they were turned into ballets, that must have been something. I did see metamorphosis, the trial and a report to the academy on the stage and I must tell you all three were breathtaking. I was very lucky.

  • Franz Schmidt

    Franz Schmidt

    Ай бұрын

    @Rhonda Bower As proven by having Metamorphosis and The Trial turned into ballets ...

  • Rhonda Bower

    Rhonda Bower

    2 ай бұрын

    @Wizard of B While he was alive he was so troubled by his father who dominated him Kafka didn’t even want to publish. But yes you’re right maybe it would have helped him if there was positive recognition for his writing. The good part for us is that his stories were published and we love them for their beauty and their humanity as well as their sadness.

  • Rhonda Bower

    Rhonda Bower

    2 ай бұрын

    To refer to something as Kafkaesque is an honor. Kafka was and is not underrated, he is enormously beloved and respected.

  • Dayface
    Dayface3 ай бұрын

    So, this might not be the best place to put it, but I've spent six years on my short story anthology and it's releasing July 8th. It's heavily inspired by Kafkaesque, Ligottian, Borgesian themes. Sartre, Nietzsche, etc. Existentialism, metafiction, transmodernism, lalalala. But it primarily concerns trauma, delirium, and upset. It's called DELIRIUMS by Kajoch and will be on Amazon. Bit weird advertising here, but I really liked the vibe of the comments section and I understand there's not much literature like this out there. Thank you for the video it was wonderful :)

  • Lakshya Gangwar

    Lakshya Gangwar

    Ай бұрын

    @Dayface eyy, where can I read it?

  • Dayface

    Dayface

    2 ай бұрын

    @Lynn Pearson Thank you so much! It's out now!!!! I really don't like promoting ahah but I thought I'd leave a comment here for those interested :)

  • Lynn Pearson

    Lynn Pearson

    2 ай бұрын

    Congratulations!!!🍀

  • karen swan
    karen swan3 ай бұрын

    I enjoyed this immensely thank you! I adored Kafka when I was a young student. In fact I named my cat Kafka 😊

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Glad you enjoyed it!

  • Sania Rahman
    Sania RahmanАй бұрын

    Thank you for your time and effort in creating this beautifully narrated video. You have done an excellent job of explaining Kafkaesque.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Ай бұрын

    Thank you for your kind words.

  • kevin
    kevin2 ай бұрын

    Beautifully written script. Thank you!

  • h rangarao
    h rangarao2 ай бұрын

    Wonderful.A more lucid presentation impossible for me to imagination. Grippingly interesting through and through.Si,look forward to many more.Thank you.

  • Dee Peacemaker
    Dee PeacemakerАй бұрын

    What an amazing work you've done, my friend. Just brilliant 👏👌😀

  • Madeleine Swann
    Madeleine Swann3 ай бұрын

    This was so interesting. I think Kafka might be the writer I identify with most (not that I'm anywhere near as good)

  • Guowei Duan
    Guowei DuanАй бұрын

    This is a really great work. I have an idea, correct me if I were wrong, it would be better if you can introduce a little bit of literature history, so we can know how big impact/change Kafka brought to this community. Thanks!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Ай бұрын

    Good point.

  • Wilhelm Hesse
    Wilhelm Hesse3 ай бұрын

    A common theme I think found in his works is we all try to find meaning in life, we look around and yet the possible answers are right in front of us or maybe they aren't and maybe it doesn't even matter whether the answers are there or not.

  • Chris Salazar
    Chris Salazar Жыл бұрын

    I really enjoy these videos for there inside view of one the great writers , and you should keep going!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Жыл бұрын

    Thanks, will do!

  • Rachel R
    Rachel R3 ай бұрын

    Nice video, I think Kafka exposes the human darkside. I loved the Metamorphosis and I'm glad to see I understood the same as the video. I found it easy to read actually

  • Sourav Chakraborty
    Sourav Chakraborty2 ай бұрын

    Kafka's novels are not unfinished, they are finished by their own way and that makes them special.

  • willie luncheonette
    willie luncheonette5 ай бұрын

    " I would like to tell you one of the most beautiful parables that has been written down the centuries. Parables have almost disappeared from the world because those beautiful people - Jesus, Buddha, who created many parables - have disappeared. A parable is not an ordinary story, a parable is a device - a device to say something which cannot ordinarily be said, a device to hint at something which can be hinted at only very indirectly. This parable is written in this age; a very rare man, Franz Kafka, has written it. He was really a rare man. He struggled hard not to write because, he said, what he wanted to write could not be written. So he struggled hard but he could not control the temptation to write, so he wrote. And he wrote in one of his diaries,”I am writing because it is difficult not to write, and knowing well that it is difficult also to write. Seeing no way out of it, I am writing.” And when he died, he left a will in the name of one of his friends to say, “Please burn everything that I have written - my diaries, my stories, my parables, my sketches, my notes. And burn them without reading them. Because this is the only way that I can get rid of that constant anxiety that I have been trying to say something which cannot be said. And I could not resist so I have written. Now this is the only way. I have written it because I could not control myself. I had to write knowing well that it could not be written, so now, without reading it, destroy, burn everything utterly. Nothing should be left.” But the friend could not do it. And it is good that he did not. This is one of Kafka’s parables. Listen to it, meditate over it. “I gave order for my horse to be brought from the stable. The servant did not understand me. I myself went to the stable, saddled my horse and mounted. In the distance I heard a bugle call. I asked him what this meant. He knew nothing and had heard nothing. At the gate he stopped me, asking,’Where are you riding to, Master?’ ‘I don’t know,’ I said, ‘only away from here. Away from here, always away from here. Only by doing so can I reach my destination.’ ‘And so you know your destination?’ he asked. ‘Yes,’ I answered. ‘Did not I say so? Away from here - that’s my destination.’ ‘You have no provisions with you, ‘ he said. ‘I need none,’ I said. ‘The journey is so long that I must die of hunger if I don’t get anything along the way. No provisions can save me because the journey is so long, I cannot carry enough provisions for it. No provisions can save me because it is, fortunately, a truly immense journey.'” Now this is the parable. “The destination,” he says, “is away from here. Away from here is my destination.” That’s how the whole world is moving: away from here, away from now. You don’t know where you are going but one thing is certain - you are going away from here, away from now. The parable says it is an immense journey. It is really endless because you can never reach away from here. How can you reach “away from here”? Wherever you will reach, it will be here. And again you will be trying to go away from here. There is no way to reach this destination. If away from here is the destiny then there is no way to reach it. And we are all escaping away from here. Watch. Don’t allow this parable to become your life. Ordinarily everybody is doing this - knowingly, unknowingly. Start moving into the here, start moving into the now. And then there is tremendous happiness - so much so that it starts overflowing from you. Not only you delight in it, it starts overflowing, it starts becoming your climate, it becomes like a cloud around you. So whoever comes close to you becomes full of it. Even others will start partaking of it, participating in it. And the more you have, the more you will be drowning into the herenow. Then a moment comes when you don’t have any space left for yourself - only happiness exists; you disappear. But of two things - the past and the future - be alert."

  • Sparky's Malarkey

    Sparky's Malarkey

    2 ай бұрын

    @willie luncheonette I cannot stop thinking about his friend not following through. He said please. I am genuinely shocked by Kafka's writings, so much so that I feel exposed. Learning what his friend did makes feel like I just invaded his private thoughts. I would be devastated to know my "friend" did such a thing to me.

  • willie luncheonette

    willie luncheonette

    2 ай бұрын

    @Nyre Cary Again, that is from a talk by Osho. Thank you.

  • Nyre Cary

    Nyre Cary

    2 ай бұрын

    👏yes , beautifully written you taught me so much of myself though it thank you

  • willie luncheonette

    willie luncheonette

    2 ай бұрын

    @FramHouse Thank you. Those are not my words. They are from a talk by Osho.

  • FramHouse

    FramHouse

    2 ай бұрын

    Willie.....you seem to have understand what KAFKA wanted but could never see or recognize. He was running away instead of moving towards. And when you run away.....that thing you run away follows you in different forms but the same vibrational pattern. Additionally Kafka was unable to extricate himself from the darkness because all he wrote and spoke about was the dark. Law of attraction had him wrapped up pretty tight with no one to show him how to extricate himself. At the end of his life...he tried to rid himself of the darkness and hoped that it wouldn't touch others.....but ......he couldn't burn his writing himself and his friend was a vibrational match also....and so his writings remain. Now there is only one take away. Be careful of what you are focused on. Focus becomes Reality. 🙏😁

  • Nick
    NickАй бұрын

    Superb video! Looks like I got some more reading to do. I find much of Kafka incredibly relatable, almost uncomfortably so. Personally I don't "agree" with every one of his thoughts (as you laid them out here) but there is so much of his thought I wholeheartedly agree with. I'm amazed how many of the points you laid out are viewpoints that I share (alienation, hatred of the system, hatred of modernity, hatred of the hyper-capitalist system we live under). I guess I'm a Christian Kafka-ist. Did I just make a new term?

  • Quantum Math
    Quantum Math2 ай бұрын

    Keep up the great work Fiction Beast. It engaged me from start to finish. 1. As an expat/academic living in Germany, I agree that the legal system seems to have encircled different aspects of my freedom, more so than I have experienced in a few other countries I resided in earlier. I can only imagine how Kafka had felt as a Jew living in Czech, another Germanic sphere at the time. 2. The struggle to find meaning and lead a prolific life despite the inevitable nature's tragedies is at the core of many philosophies and religions. Kafka seems to depict both the necessity of such pursuit and the reality of the almost-certain failure. Cheers from Hamburg, Germany.

  • Quantum Math

    Quantum Math

    9 күн бұрын

    Thnak you Sachie. @Sachie Asamizu

  • Sachie Asamizu

    Sachie Asamizu

    10 күн бұрын

    What a chilling sentence(2), but strangely beautiful.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Thank you for sharing your experience. Enjoyed reading it.

  • Hollow Men
    Hollow MenАй бұрын

    I have a question. In most of his stories he always presents an unfeeling group of three people and describes them as left right and middle. It seems like a symbol he's playing with but I don't knowwhat of. Do you have any insight into why he always uses this symbol as well as constantly dividing things into right and left with his descriptions?

  • Ram dular Singh
    Ram dular Singh2 ай бұрын

    Literary genius of the last century and even the beginning of this century too !

  • Paul Kossak
    Paul Kossak26 күн бұрын

    What I found in much of his writings was his sense of irony, saying one thing but meaning another. One of his lines has always stayed with me. "Please sleep faster, I need the pillow"

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    26 күн бұрын

    That’s funny too

  • Gangadhar Hiremath
    Gangadhar Hiremath3 ай бұрын

    "Beauty of failure" is not an apt description of Kafka's writings. His writing is a commentary on the absurdity of aimless modern living and fight against pro establishment societal authorities.

  • Avtar Gondara
    Avtar Gondara19 күн бұрын

    Perfect presentation. Informatory and educating.

  • Joe Doe
    Joe DoeАй бұрын

    I really loved this video and the narration.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Ай бұрын

    Cheers!

  • Tharaka Caldera
    Tharaka Caldera2 ай бұрын

    This was an in-depth and creative way to put everything about Kafka in the simplest form. Hats off to the writer and the narrator ... This is definitely a tremendous work ...

  • Dominic M

    Dominic M

    Ай бұрын

    shame a lot of the information is incorrect

  • Nackte Poesie
    Nackte Poesie2 ай бұрын

    "he worked long hours" wrong he worked part time, "he retired and got a pension at 35" wrong his petition was denied, "he had a limitless sex drive and visited prostitutes" wrong he had basically zero sex drive and was disgusted by things involving flesh. Greetings from the empire! Corrections of the first 5 minutes.

  • Péter Szőke
    Péter Szőke2 ай бұрын

    This video's statement is that the main theme of Kafka is the nightmare. But I have always believed otherwise. The nightmare is certainly there. But the source of it is bureaucracy which Kafka understood and described better and more profoundly than anyone. This is not to criticize the video. Quite the contrary, I thank you for it because its message and title are beautiful and true.

  • Donald Gardner Stacy
    Donald Gardner Stacy2 ай бұрын

    This fellow presents a very good introduction to Franz Kafka. Sometimes his remarks are rather amusing. He properly underscores the nightmarish quality of the experiences described in his stories and novels. Apart from "Amerika," Kafka's favorite as the speaker points out, all the rest of his work shares the unyielding aspect of a nightmare.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Thank you!

  • Krappy
    Krappy2 ай бұрын

    Thank you! An excellent introduction to Kafka.

  • Jonak Dowerah
    Jonak Dowerah3 ай бұрын

    i like kafka's innocent face. i will read his book someday.

  • Adam Ant
    Adam Ant3 ай бұрын

    What about Gogol's considerable influence on Kafka? Gogol essentially created the archetype of the pitiful government employee feebly opposing an inscrutable, merciless authority. Like Kafka, Gogol also destroyed his work near his death.

  • j0nnyism

    j0nnyism

    2 ай бұрын

    Yea I liked the overcoat

  • Sam Momin

    Sam Momin

    3 ай бұрын

    Gogol's The Inspector General was an amazing play that had such an immense influence on me.

  • Adam Ant

    Adam Ant

    3 ай бұрын

    @Fiction Beast I will. Thank you.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Yes I realized it when I read Gogol. Check out my Gogol video and I discuss it.

  • Hasibul Topu
    Hasibul Topu Жыл бұрын

    You're truly genius someone. And yeah " Metamorphosis" is one of my all time favourite story. Thanks for your detailing contents Go ahead. You'll be great critic or maybe storywriter

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Жыл бұрын

    Wow, thank you!

  • Ruben
    Ruben3 ай бұрын

    Love your channel, keep up the good work my man❤️

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Thank you.

  • heekyung Kim
    heekyung Kim9 ай бұрын

    Great insight on kafka. I am unbeautiful failure. Failed almost everything in life has to offer. So I can quiet relate to character from The Metamorphosis.

  • yettiluch1

    yettiluch1

    2 ай бұрын

    I certainly can relate. I believe my failures are a symptom of the reality that I have failed myself. But, I also believe we are all a work in progress. As long as there is a will to change we can get to where we want to be. Good lucc to you all.

  • heekyung Kim

    heekyung Kim

    2 ай бұрын

    @onion6foot Hi. Yes book, music.movie,philosophy definitely helps. I lead solitary life as i am kind of loner myself. Loneliness has been with me all my life…

  • heekyung Kim

    heekyung Kim

    2 ай бұрын

    @frog you can try next time to get your license. Good luck 🍀

  • onion6foot

    onion6foot

    2 ай бұрын

    @heekyung Kim I have similar feelings as you (of failure and isolation). Books have helped. For often they are the gift of a person's entire life and soul. A sharing with lonely, worn down ppl ...like us.

  • frog

    frog

    2 ай бұрын

    Aye, I just failed my driving test 😔

  • Tim Travasos
    Tim Travasos2 ай бұрын

    Always loved Kafka's unique view.

  • Qamar M
    Qamar M3 ай бұрын

    Kafka is one of the most inspirational writers of his time , i always to read him with intellectual understanding.

  • Jack Lawrence
    Jack Lawrence3 ай бұрын

    Wonderful video, Fiction Beast. I love your take on Kafka and his stories and the lessons of his life and struggles. Beautiful. Thanks for creating this.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Appreciate your comment and feedback.

  • redshiftexperiment
    redshiftexperiment3 ай бұрын

    What u say here is beautiful. Wonderful positive messages. I remember reading the Metamorphosis and even though it was so sad, I found it funny enough to laugh at because of the absurdity and how easy the situation was to relate to in an absurd way. This message of hope u mention, to keep trying even though things seem hopeless and not to be sad when friends abandon you because we are all ultimately alone. This like Kafkas work is ultimately an absurdly positive message. Thanks so much for posting.

  • Thomas Schinkel

    Thomas Schinkel

    Ай бұрын

    Clear analysis and context

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Thank you!

  • pallavi dake
    pallavi dake2 ай бұрын

    wow, thankyou for sharing and for the work you put in this

  • Castelo de Ossos
    Castelo de Ossos2 ай бұрын

    My favourite Kafka quotation is from his diary 4th August 1914: 'Deutschland hat Russland den Krieg erklärt. - Nachmittag Schwimmschule.' ('Germany has declared war on Russia. In the afternoon the swimming school.') The latter sentence means he went swimming in the afternoon.

  • CatApocalypse
    CatApocalypse Жыл бұрын

    Very informative! I never realized he hadn't finished a novel.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Жыл бұрын

    I didnt know that either until I started making this video. It's incredible that now he's considered one of the best novelists who didnt think he was good enough to even finish a novel. that's how much we know ourselves.

  • प्रत्युष प्रभाकर
    प्रत्युष प्रभाकर29 күн бұрын

    This is so profound. 🌸😇

  • LonerWeirdo
    LonerWeirdoАй бұрын

    'Metamorphosis' might as well have been an allegory for joblessness. That's what it feels like, you know in the eyes of society. Over night, you become a cockroach. Then seeking help, benefits, futher horror. Kafka speaks to me. It also speaks to me he didn't want his works published. I think he lived with a great deal of shame, all his life.. it's a horror I wouldn't wish on anyone. You wreck yourself dealing with that.

  • consequences
    consequences3 ай бұрын

    Whoever speaks does not understand their own limitations. Kafka was a Jew. And his existential writings are subsumed with that. Both his own condition and those of every Jew. Existence as Kafka understood it. Being accused of a "crime"; unknown, unspoken: the crime is existing as a Jew, for Kafka and every Jew. Then ultimately taken outside and shot. As happened in Europe about 20 years after the book (including his sisters). Poland, Ukraine, Czechoslovakia, Germany, etc.. Metamorphosis into an insect? The identity became rats and vermin in German Nazi Cinema not 20 years from writing. Goes on and on. Your waffling is tiresome.

  • Tom Ato
    Tom Ato22 күн бұрын

    That spider web 🕸️ you saw in this video is a natural representation of the Internet as a lot of people try to become way too clever in their Internet Scams & get trapped by the Evil🕷️Spider of their own Cold Apathy😲🤺

  • Tom Zeman
    Tom ZemanКүн бұрын

    An imperfect perfectionist Kafka was superseded by another Kafka but that's another story.

  • Electronics Academy
    Electronics Academy2 ай бұрын

    IMHO writing was an outlet for Kafka. Writing creatively about his turmoil provided him the gratification to stay sane. I don't think Kafka wrote anything with the intention to beautify his failures. He would be the last person to consider his works to be art. I'm certain he would not publish his books had he lived on. While the sane find his writings, works of art and an expression of his genius, the insane and the broken truly would understand him for who he was. Marvelling at Kafka's genius is similar to marvelling at an injured and dying animal, of course with genius level intellect.

  • Clive Uckfield
    Clive Uckfield2 ай бұрын

    Brilliant, love this story and the comments posted by this interesting community.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Thank you!

  • Sunipa Banerjee
    Sunipa Banerjee2 ай бұрын

    It's an amazing video ❤️thank you!

  • L. C.
    L. C.2 ай бұрын

    Hey, just bumped here, your work is amazing. Please keep going this channel is a gem. Thank you very much.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Appreciate it.

  • Mehar-un- Nisa
    Mehar-un- Nisa2 ай бұрын

    It is such a beautifully researched video.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Appreciate it

  • Lester Diamond
    Lester DiamondАй бұрын

    When I hear about the lives of many writers and artists, I realize what a fortunate man I am. My life has been a picnic compared to a lot of these people. My biggest problem, not enough boats. I love boats!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    Ай бұрын

    You’re lucky

  • Human Interfaces
    Human Interfaces18 күн бұрын

    Marvellous commentary. Thank you for such efforts. Jeremy.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    18 күн бұрын

    Glad you enjoyed it

  • Maaya me
    Maaya meАй бұрын

    His failure enlightened him which perhaps he did not realize but perhaps he did eventually.. Who knows for all we know is he was brilliant in his understanding of life..

  • Johann Ocampo
    Johann Ocampo6 күн бұрын

    Maravilloso!

  • ARVIND KUMAR
    ARVIND KUMARАй бұрын

    How enchanting a presentation!

  • Scott Harrison
    Scott Harrison2 ай бұрын

    I would love to get a transcript of this very helpful video. Is this at all possible? Thank you for this valuable insight into Kafka!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    You can get it though patreon

  • Dwipock Ranjan Bhowmick
    Dwipock Ranjan Bhowmick2 ай бұрын

    এই জিনিসের ক্যাপসানে বাংলা পাবো ভাবি নাই। যে কাজটা করেছেন, তাকে অনেক ধন্যবাদ জানাই। * I felt very astonished that i found 'Bengali' language in caption section. Whoever did this, i would like to give a big thanks from the bottom of my heart. the content of this channel is quiet impressive and interesting. Keep rocking \m/

  • Shakir Baloch
    Shakir Baloch2 ай бұрын

    Thanks for sharing his unique integrity of literature in one video with good criticism. 🍒

  • Robert CROSS
    Robert CROSSАй бұрын

    "I hope to depart in no other way than looking back with love and wistfulness and thinking, oh paintings that I would have made...." Vincent Van Gough.

  • Elvy Lopez
    Elvy Lopez2 ай бұрын

    Lmao @ telling us not to feel bad about not finishing one of his books because Kafka didn’t either 💀😂

  • Kinshuk Tiwari
    Kinshuk Tiwari3 ай бұрын

    Philosophy & Psychology....Just the kind of channel I was looking for and exactly line up with my curiosity and interest.. Don't mind If I do (Subscribed Actively)

  • Zoius Kritselius
    Zoius Kritselius2 ай бұрын

    Informative, educational and insightful video overall.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    Appreciate it.

  • Farzam Nemati
    Farzam Nemati9 ай бұрын

    Great! Incredible! Splendid! It was really good.And now i see these points in a retrospect. Can i ask how did you become like this??I really like to be like you adlist in this particular aspect

  • Octagon9

    Octagon9

    2 ай бұрын

    @Fiction Beast hello sir, are you familiar with idries shahs work?

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    9 ай бұрын

    Thank you so much 😀

  • Angela Soto
    Angela Soto14 күн бұрын

    Does that mean Kafka "quiet quit" his insurance job to become a writer? Gotta Love him!

  • Kenneth Diller
    Kenneth DillerАй бұрын

    As a youth I was a farmer. I aided creation which is continual in every moment of existence. I saw patterns in the renewal of life and a consciousness behind all creation. God or nature gives out ot its abundance and I aided that process. Because I think there is consciousness behind all creation I fell in love with learning. It is true that our 3 D structure does affect our learning and if we were of five or more dimensions we would see a different Universe then the one we presently live in. The observer does affect the outcome. But, we persist in learning more and coming closer to the oneness of existence. Hope springs eternal and propels us forward.

  • Cut The Bullshit
    Cut The Bullshit7 күн бұрын

    Thanks for this I recently had al small but significant victory where I defended myself against the Irish State in court and won. Sounds like Kafka would have enjoyed that. 😄

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    7 күн бұрын

    Awesome. Would love to hear more.

  • Anna
    Anna2 ай бұрын

    Thank you, its so beautiful philosophy.

  • RamasamyArumugam1927
    RamasamyArumugam19272 ай бұрын

    Thank you, Sir. You are an inspiring storyteller. I have subscribed to your channel

  • Dead Poet
    Dead Poet7 ай бұрын

    Love your page!!! Keep it up We want more!!!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    7 ай бұрын

    Thank you! Will do!

  • mstorandelli Rattelmueller
    mstorandelli Rattelmueller3 ай бұрын

    That was beautiful. Now I have to go tell stories.

  • Sapientum Octavus
    Sapientum Octavus3 ай бұрын

    No doubt that Kafka raises important questions and makes one think on existential questions (and that's probably his biggest achievement), but Kafkaesque philosophy itself does have severe problems. Here is a possible line of reasoning: If human life is not sacred, then what is?.. Then obviously nothing is really sacred. And if nothing is sacred then why should we be good to others? No, I mean, if that gives you satisfaction, then please, by all means. But if everything is absurd, then everything is permitted, as long as it's fun, because it's just one big huge sad carnival. What if one developed taste for evil (which is really easy to do by even by accident) and thus finds satisfaction in evil - then if nothing is sacred and everything is absurd, there is no rational basis to be good, but there are very good reasons to do evil (pleasure ). That means, killing an old lady is just as good as helping her, and raping a girl is just as acceptable as saving her. And why not? Everything is absurd anyway! You say that one should be good to others? Says who? And on which basis? If everything is absurd, then being good to others is just as valid as not being good to others, as a strategy, if that works and serves your purposes. That is the brutally practical philosophy of Machiavelli. Obviously, as a Christian I reject this kind of reasoning, but that is only because I do believe that there are some things which are sacred - namely God, human soul, and possibly there are more. Without that basis, it is not even possible to argue for doing good or being good to others. As succinctly put by great existential philosopher Dostoyevsky: "If there is no God, everything is permitted". That said, the value of Kafka is in arousing the readers to at least recognize the problem and start thinking about the possible solutions on their own. Even though Kafka himself apparently failed to find them.

  • whatisnotmind?whatisnotuniverse?whatisnotcreator?

    whatisnotmind?whatisnotuniverse?whatisnotcreator?

    2 ай бұрын

    because of religion people do bad things because they always believe they will be forgiven by God because they are the chosen ones...

  • Sapientum Octavus

    Sapientum Octavus

    2 ай бұрын

    ​@Mitthenstein _it just happens because that’s my nature, and I wouldn’t be here otherwise_ I believe you are mistaken -- that, which you call your naturally good "nature" in the above statement is not nature at all... It is in fact something entirely different -- namely, it's the "culture." And not just any culture, but a very specific one -- the Christian culture of the Western society, with its highly developed moral values, such as extremely high value of individual person's life and extension of personality to all people, not just kings, heroes or nobles. From your earliest childhood, its essentially Christian values have been unconsciously absorbed by your developing mind through subtle things like behavior of your parents, books you read, and stories you heard. This became so much ingrained in you that you indeed started to believe that this was your true nature. In that sense, even if you are an atheist, you are in fact a Christian atheist. But the harsh reality is very different, and much more ugly. The real human nature is usually revealed only in most extreme circumstances (war, death camp, etc.), when the thin veneer of the culture (which the person sincerely believed to be his true nature) is shorn off by violently hostile existential forces, and the man for the first time realizes who he really is -- a beast, a monster, capable of things that he never even imagined a human being could be capable to do to another human being. And for many this terrible revelation turns out to be existentially catastrophic or even fatal.

  • Mitthenstein

    Mitthenstein

    3 ай бұрын

    @Roman Zemar You make some good points, I’ll try to remember to reply properly when I get the chance 👍

  • Roman Zemar

    Roman Zemar

    3 ай бұрын

    @Mitthenstein the things you count as historical evidence are singular and cherry-picked events like, probably, Crusades or witch hunting. From the religious perspective, the said actions weren't random acts of criminal violence, but forms of punishment. Given that back in the day punishment by death was seen as normal it's not surprising that so many conflics were solved so brutally by killing. I'm not trying to justify the mentioned events in the Christian world - I'm a Muslim, but I understand the value of historico-cultural context for a divine codex to function in. The point being is, you count only large empirically observable political events for your evidence, then you narrow them down to the authority/violence issue, then you highlight only negative ones (as if some Cristian king couldn't have been motivated by religion, against his otherwise worse judgement, to pardon a criminal). To return your words for me to yourself: "look outside". You overlook the main area of religious influence - the customs and morals of an ordinary man. And this is where Orthodox culture helps Russian government - the promotion of family values is a good example. We don't want to become extinct and thus limit the exposure of our society to detrimental images. Like the one quite common in the West: a solitary person who surrounds himself with individual hobbies (anime, gardening and whatnot) and entertainment to mask his lack of communitation with his extended family which relates to him most => deserves to be tied with. This trade, done under the pretext of independence, backfires in the form of the black dog and higher depression probability. Russian government regulates the spread of queer ideas and, for all it's sins that no doubt exist, does the most pro-life thing by promoting values that improve chidbirth (i.e. "maternity capital" policy - look it up), tighten families, prevent inner exermination though queer ideologies. Such powerful moral anchorage wouldn't exist here if it hadn't been for Abrahamic religions.

  • Darkness Within
    Darkness Within3 ай бұрын

    An advice to all viewers- Do watch the video untill the end, you are not Kafka so don't leave it unfinished otherwise you might miss-understand Kafka, as well.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Great advice.

  • FetterFettsackFett
    FetterFettsackFett4 ай бұрын

    Thank you for this video. Very well done. Greetings from Germany :D

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    4 ай бұрын

    Thanks so much.

  • Hamid Ghilaw
    Hamid Ghilaw2 ай бұрын

    Thanks. very useful, informative and rich in content.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    My pleasure!

  • Paul Roth
    Paul Roth3 ай бұрын

    i don’t think that kafka is a good example for the calendar phrase “fail beautifully” . his writing shows everything, including the absurde, the strange, the awkward. if it says something about failure i think it would be “you will inevitably fail, and it will hurt. but failure is the beauty”

  • Paul Roth

    Paul Roth

    2 ай бұрын

    @whatisnotmind?whatisnotuniverse?whatisnotcreator? 😂 that’s the great thing about literature. you can take from it what ever lurches at you… but i don’t see the category “happy” in the world of kafkas writing. he seems to champion passions/(sexual) urges and enjoyment as a means of acting on one’s (repressed) needs. but happiness? it’s more like he is against this modern notion/obligation of doing things in order to create happiness. the american motto of, “pursuit of happiness” is not a thing which seems to even count for a jewish man, living in austro-hungary. i recommend you “the trial” . it might be strange, but there is a bunch of enjoyment and absurd humor in it. you be the judge if it is such a thing as happiness

  • whatisnotmind?whatisnotuniverse?whatisnotcreator?

    whatisnotmind?whatisnotuniverse?whatisnotcreator?

    2 ай бұрын

    we will be happy even we are failing.

  • Octagon9

    Octagon9

    2 ай бұрын

    i like failure better then success cause of opportunities to learn same regarding criticism vs praise due to its effects on performance

  • Utkarsh P
    Utkarsh P3 ай бұрын

    you also tell stories beautifully.

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    3 ай бұрын

    Cheers!

  • Nora S.
    Nora S.2 ай бұрын

    Verry good analysis and interpretation! Thank you!

  • Fiction Beast

    Fiction Beast

    2 ай бұрын

    You’re welcome